Back to Home
 

Author Archive: Cloud Connect Staff


Posts:

 
Published by

Cloud Connect has been closely tracking the recent heated debate around which infrastructure is best suited for the enterprise cloud. There’s still no clear verdict, so Cloud Connect will continue the conversation from the keynote stage in Chicago. From accessibility to cost to security, AWS, CloudStack and OpenStack all have their benefits and limitations, which experts will thoroughly explore during the keynote panel, “Stack Wars: The Battle for the Enterprise Cloud.”

We’re pleased to announce that Margaret Dawson, VP of Product Marketing & Cloud Evangelist of HP Cloud Services will moderate the panel, which will include advocates for these competitive platforms. Margaret is perfectly positioned to host this session, with more than 20 years of global leadership experience and ample time spent working in the cloud industry. Prior to her current position at HP, she ran point for two cloud startups in the B2B integration and data storage markets, and served at Microsoft and Amazon.com. She has a keen understanding of cloud trends, and is a valued member of both the Cloud Connect Advisory Council and the Cloud Network of Women (CloudNOW).

This is a session you won’t want to miss. We’ll be revealing panelists closer to the event, so be sure to check back on the Cloud Connect Chicago keynote page for more information. In the meantime, if you’re on Twitter, follow Margaret ‏@seattledawson to keep tabs on her perspective on the cloud.

What’s your stack of choice? Weigh in at Cloud Connect Chicago, October 21-23 at McCormick Place. If you haven’t already, register now to lock in Early Bird pricing and save up to $500 on Conference Passes.

 
Published by

Excitement is building as we put the finishing touches on our 2013 Cloud Connect Chicago program. We’ve incorporated a number of new program elements that we’re excited to share with you and can’t wait to get to Chicagoland this October to delve into discussions around both the state and future of cloud computing.

The new Cloud Connect Conference program provides practitioners and decision makers the ability to evaluate completing choices, evaluate all the issues surrounding competing cloud stacks as well as stimulate necessary debates.  To help enhance your Cloud Connect experience we’ve outlined a list of new tools, Summits, Boot Camps, and must attend sessions!

1. Pre-Conference Networking

 

 

 

With registration launched and sessions added you can get a head start on planning your itinerary by adding sessions via the Session Scheduler and our Cloud Connect Mobile App. Once you add a session on Session Schedule your session will automatically be added to your schedule in the Cloud Connect Mobile App. Use the Mobile App to also network with other attendees, ask questions to exhibitors, see what’s trending, and plan your Conference agenda.

2. CompTIA Cloud Essential Training

The Cloud Essentials Course, facilitated by CompTIA, is a one-day training course that prepares you for the CompTIA Cloud Essentials Certification. Each attendee who completes the course in full will be provided a complimentary voucher to take the Certification test at a testing location of your choice. This one-day course will help you be on your way to cloud certification!

3. New Education Formats

 

 

We’ve added new Summit and Boot Camp training sessions to the Cloud Connect Chicago catalog. These new three-hour intensive formats include more hands-on-training and use-cases that will examine both the technical potential and business opportunity made possible by the cloud revolution.

4. New Tracks

 

 

 

We leveraged attendee, customer and advisory board insights to bring you a new track structure aligned with key cloud players and topics: OpenStack, CloudStack, AWS & Eucalyptus, Virtualization & Private Clouds and more. Keep checking back on the Session Scheduler for additional information and new sessions.

5. Post-Show News and Updates

 

 

The Cloud Connect community and conversation does not end once the Conference is over. All Keynotes will be audio recorded, and will have audio and presentations synced and online within a week after the session is completed. They will be available on the Cloud Connect Chicago website.

 
Published by

Private Clouds continue to receive attention in enterprise organizations that are looking to amplify the benefits of virtualization and increase agility. While press reports about cloud computing are filled with lots of action and adventure, many enterprises are approaching cloud computing in a more methodical, step-by-step approach. Rather than build a complex hybrid cloud right from the start, many enterprises are looking to evolve from their current server virtualization environments to a full-fledged private cloud. When making this transition it is important for enterprises to consider:

  • What is the best approach for evolving from a server virtualization environment?
  • Who should access a private cloud, and under what controls?
  • How does a private cloud fit in with current IT management processes and systems?
  • What are the first use cases to target with your private cloud to ensure a “quick win?”
  • What landmines should you avoid?

Transitioning from virtualization environments to private clouds is something Dave Roberts, Sr. Director Solutions Marketing at BMC Software has spent over a decade tackling. Dave is chairing the Virtualization and Private Cloud Track at Cloud Connect Chicago 2013, where he will address these questions out help attendees build their private cloud roadmap. Sessions include:

Hear from companies including Boeing, Eucalyptus and BMC Software on how they moved from virtualization to private cloud environments. Register to attend Cloud Connect Chicago, use discount code SMBLOG and lock in Early Bird Pricing.

 
Published by

An entry by Dave Roberts, Virtualization and Private Clouds Track Chair at Cloud Connect.

It’s a “coming of age” story, really. The cloud computing movement is reaching a new stage in its evolution. Many early clouds were built on top of existing server virtualization systems, with the primary objective of demonstrating the underlying technologies. Having proven that cloud computing works, enterprises are now looking to graduate to clouds that will support the long-term, production needs of the business; they are looking to build professional-grade clouds that will carry them the full distance. But that then begs the question, what makes a cloud “professional-grade?”

I see three primary differentiators that characterize professional-grade clouds:

  1. The ability to deliver a range of services to the broad group of end-users served by IT. Overwhelmingly, the first use-case targeted by most cloud pilots is software development and testing. Software development is a natural fit for cloud computing since developers and testers usually have a spikey demand for infrastructure, which makes the economic model a no-brainer. Further, these early users are quite technical, and so any rough spots in the cloud user-interface can be overlooked to keep the pilot project on track. But the simple user-interfaces delivered during the pilot phase typically don’t work well as the cloud moves to production and the user base expands to include non-technical business users. Instead, you’ll want a self-service interface that even a marketing intern could love, an interface that can deliver more than raw developer building blocks like Windows or Linux virtual machines. You’ll need a service catalog with user authentication, role-based access control, and the ability to provision complete, fully-configured end-user applications like Sharepoint, wikis, and collaboration tools.
  2. The ability to support the diverse set of cloud platforms required by the enterprise, both current and future. Many early clouds were built as mere extensions of the existing server virtualization platform already deployed at the time. Take virtualization, add a self-service interface, and you’re done! That’s a reasonable decision for a pilot program or technology demonstration, but it won’t go the distance. A professional-grade cloud will use a real cloud management platform to insulate cloud users from all the underlying implementation choices, making it easy to build hybrid clouds based on a variety of underlying implementation technologies: VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer, OpenStack, a variety of public cloud providers, and even bare metal. Further, we all know that needs and technologies will evolve over time; a professional-grade cloud anticipates that future change and takes it in stride.
  3. Integration with IT processes and systems needed by the business. Most early clouds are built with clean-sheet design principles, implemented as independent islands outside normal IT processes and not integrated with existing systems. This allows the pilot project to get up and running quickly and to remain uncluttered by traditional IT thinking. Over time, however, the enterprise needs to be able to manage the performance, capacity, security, and change capabilities of the cloud, just as it does today with physical and virtualized infrastructure. Does this mean weighing down your nice, sleek, agile new cloud with two-tons of ITIL? No, not necessarily. Well-built, enterprise-class clouds cooperate with other IT systems, delivering the appropriate I-dotting and T-crossing with integration and automation so that enterprise compliance requirements and business policies remain enforced.

Now that cloud computing is growing up and going mainstream, it’s time that we got past the pilots and demos and started building professional-grade clouds that can meet real needs across the business, built for the long haul. We can leverage all the work we have done with those early projects and move them forward, building the advanced set of capabilities that will serve as the foundation moving forward.

Register for Cloud Connect Chicago with priority code SMBlog and save up to $500* on your All Access or Conference Pass.

*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $1,699.00 Conference: $1,299.00, Keynote & Expo Only: Free

 
Published by

This post was co-written by Emily Johnson and Bernard Golden

There is no question that AWS is leading the charge in IaaS with high resiliency, and dynamic development options, especially for those developing SaaS applications in the cloud. However, their API-based features can make standardization of management interfaces difficult for cloud vendors, and though it can quickly evolve to its customer’s needs, does not endorse industry standards. Luckily, there are a number of great management solutions out there and AWS continues to be a prudent financial decision. Continue Reading »

 
Published by

Bernard Golden has been called a “cloud guru” and a “cloud computing rockstar.” He is Vice President, Enterprise Solutions for Enstratius, a leading cloud management software company. In this role, he works with large enterprises throughout the world, helping them migrate to cloud computing and gain its full benefits. Formerly, was the CEO of HyperStratus, a Silicon Valley cloud computing consultancy that works with clients throughout the world. Continue Reading »

 
Published by

Brian is the CTO and co-founder of Hudl, a SaaS sports video company. His leadership of the development team and site infrastructure has led to Hudl’s cutting edge architecture and unique development squad structure. These innovations allowed Hudl to rapidly expand and capture the majority of the high school, NCAA, and NFL market for video analysis. Brian has been named in Forbes and Inc Magazine’s 30 Under 30 lists for Hudl’s impact on technology in sports. In his free time he enjoys traveling, action movies, and a good sci-fi read.

Brian Kaiser’s sessions is called “Hudl and Pearson Learning Technologies Share their Experiences Scaling in AWS – From Distributed Apps to Online Business.“  Topics to be covered include:

  • Overall architecture and associated trade-offs
  • Network topology and related technology
  • High availability and data replication
  • Security
  • Running high performing web apps using a hybrid approach

Register for Cloud Connect Chicago with priority code SMBlog and save up to $500* on your All Access or Conference Pass.

 

*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $1,699.00 Conference: $1,299.00, Keynote & Expo Only: Free

 
Published by

Cloud computing is exponentially growing and now an assumed part of any infrastructure.  One of the critical needs of this industry is for trained professionals to assure that the cloud is implemented responsibly, and with the appropriate security controls in any organization. Certification is a great way to help advance your career and gain a leg up in the market.

Which types of end users care about this certification?

There are hundreds of IT and business positions that require cloud competence. As purchasing decisions shift from IT to the LOB it is important that more and more business functions understand the core competencies of the cloud. If your organization is adopting cloud at any level, or you’re considering advancing your career within the cloud market, one of the best ways to make that transition is with cloud certification.

What types of certification exists?

Many vendor companies are starting their own certification programs, but these only allow you to get certified on vendor programs or technologies. For a third party certification program we recommend CompTIA Cloud Essentials. The Cloud Essentials certification is a general-purpose tool you can use to show you understand all aspects of cloud computing.

Cloud Connect has partnered with CompTIA to bring the Cloud Essential training to Cloud Connect Chicago this October. Register for this one-day course and get educated on all aspects of the cloud. The training includes a voucher so you can complete the certification test at any testing center of your choice. Register by September 16 to lock in Early Bird pricing on the training – just $599.

 
Published by

We are entering the era of the “Composable Enterprise Model” (CEM), where IT systems and data can be composed into new, business-facing offerings with relative ease. In some ways, CEM represents a pragmatic realization of the “loose coupling” ideal that has fueled recent architectural trends.  CEM is a multi-faceted gem, a collection of best practices and technologies combined with the real world implementation of open standards.  IT succeeds by abstracting the layers of infrastructure, applications and data into common services that can be dynamically accessed.  Infrastructure turns into a platform. Core business operations turn into services that are used by other applications. Applications and data are abstracted from physical infrastructure using platform-as-a-service (PaaS).

[Jared Wray, Tier 3 founder and CTO, will present his thoughts on using Platform as a Service in the Composable Enterprise at this year’s Cloud Connect Chicago.]

Continue Reading »

 
Published by

Cloud Connect is excited to announce the 2013 Chicago Conference Lineup. With the competition heating up between CloudStack, OpenStack and Eucalyptus, the new Cloud Connect Conference program pits these players against each other and allows you to evaluate the competing choices, to put all the issues on the table, fuel intelligent dialogue and stimulate the necessary debates. New tracks include:

Visit the Session Scheduler to see all Conference Tracks and start planning your itinerary today. And, don’t forget to lock in Early Bird pricing, register before September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your free Expo Pass. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

« Prev - Next »

 

 
  • LinkedIn
  • Photos
  • Blog