Back to Home
 

Author Archive: Lori MacVittie


Lori MacVittie is responsible for education and evangelism of application services available across F5's entire product suite. Her role includes authorship of technical materials and participation in a number of community-based forums and industry standards organizations, among other efforts. MacVittie has extensive programming experience as an application architect, as well as network and systems development and administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning Senior Technology Editor at Network Computing Magazine, where she conducted product research and evaluation focused on integration with application and network architectures, and authored articles on a variety of topics aimed at IT professionals. Her most recent area of focus included SOA-related products and architectures. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

Posts:

 
Published by

While we’ve finally stopped – for the most part anyway – arguing over the very definition of cloud computing, we have just begun arguing over other cloud-related topics. “Hybrid” and “private” cloud are likely two of the most contentious subjects today, the very definitions of which are still at times hotly debated. There are some who assert that private cloud computing is nothing more than in practice than highly virtualized data centers while others claim such implementations are real and providing significant value to the organizations that have undertaken to build them.

When Randy and I sat down to fill out the Private Clouds track for CloudConnect we came at the topic from very different perspectives. Thus we tried to craft a set of sessions and invite panelists from a wide variety of experiences and industries – from vendors to experts to media to enterprises – as a means to more fully explore both the up and downside of private cloud computing.

It seems inevitable to me, at least, that hybrid cloud – when defined as the integration of disparate cloud implementations to form a virtual data center, if you will – will be the end result. A large number of organizations are already highly invested in public cloud computing, primarily SaaS offerings, and have significant investment in the integration and orchestration of said services into their own existing systems and services. As organizations move ahead with their own cloud computing initiatives, i.e. private cloud computing, that would seem to indicate an end result of a hybrid cloud computing environment – public and private, integrated and orchestrated together.

That’s easier said than done. There is a difference between a highly virtualized data center and private cloud computing, and as an organization moves from the former to the latter there are obstacles and challenges that must be met and overcome. Simply choosing a platform upon which to build and orchestrate the services that make up a private cloud computing offering is challenging, with a growing variety of solutions from both the open source and commercial world.  Choosing the “right” platform and solutions is certainly highly dependent on organizational goals and policies, but there are technical issues such as interoperability and the robustness of solution support that must also be taken into consideration. There is no simple answer, no single “right” solution because cloud computing regardless of location is about matching technology to business and operational goals; it’s about leveraging solutions and services and offerings in a way that enables an organization to be leaner and more efficient while operating within the legal and financial constraints placed upon them.

But there are folks who disagree; who firmly believe private and hybrid cloud computing don’t actually exist or, if they do, that they are merely transitory architectures that enable organizations to get to the ultimate deployment model that is public cloud computing. Is that the case? Is hybrid cloud fact, is it fiction, or is it the future of data center models? The private cloud track will culminate in just such a discussion. It’s a very pertinent question, as knowing where you’re going will certainly influence how you get there and how you build out an architecture to support your end goals.

Cloud models both obviously and subtly alter infrastructure, network, and storage decisions. It is with these concerns and issues in mind that Randy and I have crafted the Private Clouds track at CloudConnect this year, and it is our intent that the sessions provide a perspective that covers both sides of the subject – the good and the bad, the obvious and the subtle, the advocate and the critic.

 

 
  • LinkedIn
  • Photos
  • Blog