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Archive for the tag 'CIO'

 
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Brian is the CTO and co-founder of Hudl, a SaaS sports video company. His leadership of the development team and site infrastructure has led to Hudl’s cutting edge architecture and unique development squad structure. These innovations allowed Hudl to rapidly expand and capture the majority of the high school, NCAA, and NFL market for video analysis. Brian has been named in Forbes and Inc Magazine’s 30 Under 30 lists for Hudl’s impact on technology in sports. In his free time he enjoys traveling, action movies, and a good sci-fi read.

Brian Kaiser’s sessions is called “Hudl and Pearson Learning Technologies Share their Experiences Scaling in AWS – From Distributed Apps to Online Business.“  Topics to be covered include:

  • Overall architecture and associated trade-offs
  • Network topology and related technology
  • High availability and data replication
  • Security
  • Running high performing web apps using a hybrid approach

Register for Cloud Connect Chicago with priority code SMBlog and save up to $500* on your All Access or Conference Pass.

 

*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $1,699.00 Conference: $1,299.00, Keynote & Expo Only: Free

 
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Cloud computing is exponentially growing and now an assumed part of any infrastructure.  One of the critical needs of this industry is for trained professionals to assure that the cloud is implemented responsibly, and with the appropriate security controls in any organization. Certification is a great way to help advance your career and gain a leg up in the market.

Which types of end users care about this certification?

There are hundreds of IT and business positions that require cloud competence. As purchasing decisions shift from IT to the LOB it is important that more and more business functions understand the core competencies of the cloud. If your organization is adopting cloud at any level, or you’re considering advancing your career within the cloud market, one of the best ways to make that transition is with cloud certification.

What types of certification exists?

Many vendor companies are starting their own certification programs, but these only allow you to get certified on vendor programs or technologies. For a third party certification program we recommend CompTIA Cloud Essentials. The Cloud Essentials certification is a general-purpose tool you can use to show you understand all aspects of cloud computing.

Cloud Connect has partnered with CompTIA to bring the Cloud Essential training to Cloud Connect Chicago this October. Register for this one-day course and get educated on all aspects of the cloud. The training includes a voucher so you can complete the certification test at any testing center of your choice. Register by September 16 to lock in Early Bird pricing on the training – just $599.

 
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We are entering the era of the “Composable Enterprise Model” (CEM), where IT systems and data can be composed into new, business-facing offerings with relative ease. In some ways, CEM represents a pragmatic realization of the “loose coupling” ideal that has fueled recent architectural trends.  CEM is a multi-faceted gem, a collection of best practices and technologies combined with the real world implementation of open standards.  IT succeeds by abstracting the layers of infrastructure, applications and data into common services that can be dynamically accessed.  Infrastructure turns into a platform. Core business operations turn into services that are used by other applications. Applications and data are abstracted from physical infrastructure using platform-as-a-service (PaaS).

[Jared Wray, Tier 3 founder and CTO, will present his thoughts on using Platform as a Service in the Composable Enterprise at this year’s Cloud Connect Chicago.]

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Cloud Connect is excited to announce the 2013 Chicago Conference Lineup. With the competition heating up between CloudStack, OpenStack and Eucalyptus, the new Cloud Connect Conference program pits these players against each other and allows you to evaluate the competing choices, to put all the issues on the table, fuel intelligent dialogue and stimulate the necessary debates. New tracks include:

Visit the Session Scheduler to see all Conference Tracks and start planning your itinerary today. And, don’t forget to lock in Early Bird pricing, register before September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your free Expo Pass. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

 
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Cloud Connect and Everest Group conducted a joint survey to coincide with the Cloud Connect conference at Santa Clara, in April 2013.

The objectives of the survey were to:

– Identify broad-based cloud adoption patterns

– Identify barriers to adoption

– Identify decision making patterns for cloud adoption

Below is a visual of some key findings.

 

Learn more at Cloud Connect Chicago.

 

 

 
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If you are an expert in your field and would like the opportunity to share your knowledge with other technology professionals from around the world – we need you! As both a conference and an expo, Cloud Connect continues to be the leading vendor-neutral cloud computing event. Our key role is to provide a platform for application developers and managers, senior IT professionals, infrastructure and service providers to network and gain deep cloud insights. Help us share those insights!

Please find information below to guide you through the submission process. Deadline is April 29, 2013 Continue Reading »

 
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This isn’t a simple question to answer.

First of all, cloud computing is hidden behind a fog of abstraction. Whereas IT could once instrument every element of an application, today applications are like Descartes’ brain in a jar—never quite sure if they’re real, or virtual.

Second, on the surface many service providers’ goals aren’t aligned with those of their customers’. Service providers want to maximize revenues, and want the freedom to do with the underlying infrastructure what they will. That’s how they stay in business and make the most of what they have. Without that freedom, they lose economies of scale and skill. By contrast, customers want special treatment, and instrumentation all the way down the stack.

Third, people don’t really understand metrics well. Despite decades of criticism, we still use averages, even though they hide important fluctuations in service quality that can warn of bigger problems before they become disasters.

There’s a bigger problem here, however. For half a century, IT has been about protecting precious resources. The reason you put up with carrying a stack of punched cards to the basement of the computing building at 3AM was because the mainframe was scarce, and the humans abundant. No more: each of us has three screens, one of which is seldom more than a meter from our bodies at any time.

That means we’re less concerned about the consumption of resources and more concerned about the completion of tasks. We shouldn’t really care if the CPU is idle or maxed out, provided that the user accomplish what they set out to do. Proponents of Service Level Agreements have long known this, but cloud monitoring, hiding behind the fog of virtualization, drives it home hard.

Application Performance Management and Real User Monitoring have long been thought of as “advanced” forms of measurement*. These go beyond up/down metrics or numbers related to utilization, and instead look at the success of the application from the user’s point of view. They’ve often languished somewhere between web analytics (which show you what users did) and synthetic monitoring (which shows you whether the site is working.)

Today, however, the real question is: could they do it, well? There’s great evidence that slow applications undermine productivity, cost money, and cut into revenues. Slow clouds need fixing. To do this, I think we need to go beyond APM, and start with the business problem. Too often, IT professionals start at the bottom and work up. “Server 10 is down, which means the support site isn’t working, which means the phone queue is too long, which impacts our customer satisfaction rating.” They begin with the means, and work back to the end.

Instead, I think we need to step back and look at the business model. From that, we can derive the relevant metrics, and what’s considered an acceptable threshold. Then we can measure against those thresholds, and report on violations. That’s a much more palpable approach to measurement for executives. Starting at the model and working down says we say, “7% of visits need to result in an enrollment for us to meet our monthly target.” From that, we can measure the steps of an enrollment, and their performance against the past or response targets.

When we owned the infrastructure, this was considered progressive. But the fog of cloud monitoring means it’s often the only way we can measure. It lets us size cloud consumption, which in turn lets us define budgets—since with the right architecture, you can have any performance you can pay for. And it leads to good metrics, since it’s focused on rates and exceptions rather than averages.

We’ll be talking about how to measure cloud-based applications at this spring’s Cloud Connect event in Santa Clara. In fact, we have a whole track of content dedicated to it, including sessions on WAN, application delivery networks, load-balancing, and choosing the right metrics. Clouds are the IT of abundance, and they fundamentally change how we measure applications. Let’s figure out how.

 
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Each year at Cloud Connect, we try to look ahead to what the next twelve months hold. To many of us, the future was really the removal of the word “cloud.” Just as “web applications” are now just “applications”, so technologies like “cloud storage” are just “storage.” Similarly, cloud computing will soon just be “computing.”

Does that mean the future of something like Cloud Connect is simply “connect”? Sort of. New technologies are seldom interesting in their own right. Rather, they’re interesting for what they make possible.

Y-Combinator founder Paul Graham describes a startup as an organization designed for rapid growth—and he means rapid. He wants to see a 5-10% increase in users or revenues every week for companies within his accelerator. While he says that startups aren’t necessarily technology, it’s very likely that they are. That’s because technology does two things:

  • It disrupts a market. There’s not much new about Uber driving people around. We’ve had taxis for centuries. But the ubiquity of mobile applications with location awareness is new, and that’s disrupting a big market quickly. So technology can trigger a rapid change in an existing market. Growth.
  • It makes a new market. The online search industry didn’t exist twenty years ago. Today, it’s worth billions. Technology creates entirely new businesses even as it leaves old ones crumbling. 3D printing might usher in an era of manufacturing at the edge, even as it destroys traditional just-in-time logistics.

And this is why clouds are interesting. Not in their own right—they’re rapidly becoming another tool in the IT toolbox, albeit an extremely flexible one. Clouds are interesting because they make computing frictionless. They allow organizations of any size to achieve the kinds of scale and growth Graham demands of the companies he helps launch.

A couple of years ago, we joked that “big data gives clouds something to do.” There’s a lot of truth to this. Big Data itself isn’t new—and it isn’t mounting the peak of a hype curve, despite what Gartner says. Big Data has been around for ages, as anyone from a company like Teradata, IBM, Oracle, or Microsoft will tell you. What’s new about big data is the democratization of analysis. Anyone who runs a Facebook Graph Search today has more power, and more access, than any three-letter-agency in Washington dared dream of a decade ago.

And powerful, democratized analysis is a game-changer for society. It’ll alter how we work and play; how we learn and love; and how we make decisions. All because of cloud computing, which provides the elastic, on-demand undercarriage for vast analysis.

In the Futures and Disruptions track at Cloud Connect this spring, Cascade Insights’ Sean Campbell will lay out four possible futures for cloud computing in the next few years, encouraging IT professionals to hedge their bets. Allan Leinwand, whose career spans executive technology roles at Cisco, Digital Island, Zynga, and Servicenow, predicts where cloud platforms are headed. And serial entrepreneur Margaret Dawson joins Savvis’ Ed Saipetch to speculate on the future of data—and whether it’s headed for anarchy or trust.

It promises to be a fascinating look at where technology is headed, even as clouds themselves quietly blend into the fabric of everyday computing.

 
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Jason Quesada

Cloud Connect offers several flexible passes to choose from when registering. Here are my top 8 reasons (in reverse order) why you purchase a Cloud Connect All Access Pass:

8. Free Lunch! Nom nom nom

7. Make the most of your Cloud Connect experience by joining any of the following receptions or networking events.

6. Expo: See what’s new, learn what’s cutting edge and identify technology must-haves for your business.

5. Vendor Sessions

4. Keynotes: Learn from industry experts, peers and providers all sharing their insights, case studies and strategies – hear from PayPal, VMware, General Electric, Cisco and more.

3. Cloud Connect offers a variety of comprehensive workshops on both standards and emerging trends from recognized thought-leaders in the cloud space.

2. Conference Sessions: Learn about the latest cloud computing innovations at the Cloud Connect Conference—including Big Data, Infrastructure, Cloud Security, and more.

1. Save $300! Register with priority code SMBlog and save up to $300* on your Interop All Access or Conference Pass!

Lock in an All Access Pass for the best value and receive behind the scene access to Cloud Connect!

Cheers,

Jason

Feel free to follow me on Twitter for more inside Cloud Connect updates.
*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $2,099.00 Conference: $1,699.00, Workshop Pass: $799.00, Expo Plus: $150.00, Expo Only: Free

 
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A post by John Pironti, Risk Management and Security Track Chair.

Cloud computing is no longer an interesting idea or concept to be investigated by most organizations but reality that is now part of their normal business activities. It is well understood through numerous studies and analysis that security is currently the primary roadblock that prevents organizations from widely adopting cloud computing capabilities for their core and critical business activities. This situation creates an interesting scenario that is similar to the theory of the unstoppable object (Cloud Computing) and the Immovable Object (Security) and what happens when they must coexist and thrive. The capability that will ultimately help organizations to solve this challenge is the use of information risk management. Continue Reading »

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