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Archive for the tag 'Cloud Connect 2012'

 
Published by

Kristi Ibello

Cloud Connect Chicago kicks off in just over a month at McCormick Place in Chicago. Cloud Connect is the only venue where you will learn how to leverage the cloud ecosystem to develop new services, new revenue streams and new business models.  Over the course of three days, the Conference offers in-depth boot camps, panel discussions and access to a host of industry experts, all designed to help you weigh your cloud options and drive transformation.  Here is a list of the top 5 events you will want to add to your schedule. Continue Reading »

 
Published by

Kristi Ibello

Cloud Connect is excited to announce Robin Chase, Co-Founder and former CEO of ZipCar and GoLoco will be headlining the Cloud Connect Chicago 2013 Keynote Stage.

All you city dwellers or environmental enthusiast should know Zipcar as the largest car-sharing company in the world. ZipCar uses the Internet and wireless technology to enable rental cars to emulate personal cars. Much like how cloud technology has provided agility and on-demand access to businesses, Zipcar’s technology gives its members on-demand access to cars by-the-hour. This disruptive technology has revolutionized people’s relationship to their cars and improving the quality of urban life for all.

Some fun facts about Robin you may not know:

  • She is on the Board of the World Resources Institute, the National Advisory Council for Innovation & Entrepreneurship for the US Department of Commerce
  • She is a graduate of from Wellesley College and the MIT Sloan School of Management
  • She was listed as one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in 2009
  • Age when she got started at ZipCar 42
  • $75,000 was the early capital Robin and ZipCar got from angel investors. Now compare that to the $491 million amount that  Avis agreed to pay for ZipCar*

Be sure to attend Cloud Connect Chicago October 21-23, 2013 at McCormick Place to hear about Robin’s journey with ZipCar and GoLoco and how being an innovator and disruptor was pivotal to the company’s success. Register early to lock in Early Bird rates and save up to $500 on Conference Passes!

*Sourced from Inc.com

 
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This isn’t a simple question to answer.

First of all, cloud computing is hidden behind a fog of abstraction. Whereas IT could once instrument every element of an application, today applications are like Descartes’ brain in a jar—never quite sure if they’re real, or virtual.

Second, on the surface many service providers’ goals aren’t aligned with those of their customers’. Service providers want to maximize revenues, and want the freedom to do with the underlying infrastructure what they will. That’s how they stay in business and make the most of what they have. Without that freedom, they lose economies of scale and skill. By contrast, customers want special treatment, and instrumentation all the way down the stack.

Third, people don’t really understand metrics well. Despite decades of criticism, we still use averages, even though they hide important fluctuations in service quality that can warn of bigger problems before they become disasters.

There’s a bigger problem here, however. For half a century, IT has been about protecting precious resources. The reason you put up with carrying a stack of punched cards to the basement of the computing building at 3AM was because the mainframe was scarce, and the humans abundant. No more: each of us has three screens, one of which is seldom more than a meter from our bodies at any time.

That means we’re less concerned about the consumption of resources and more concerned about the completion of tasks. We shouldn’t really care if the CPU is idle or maxed out, provided that the user accomplish what they set out to do. Proponents of Service Level Agreements have long known this, but cloud monitoring, hiding behind the fog of virtualization, drives it home hard.

Application Performance Management and Real User Monitoring have long been thought of as “advanced” forms of measurement*. These go beyond up/down metrics or numbers related to utilization, and instead look at the success of the application from the user’s point of view. They’ve often languished somewhere between web analytics (which show you what users did) and synthetic monitoring (which shows you whether the site is working.)

Today, however, the real question is: could they do it, well? There’s great evidence that slow applications undermine productivity, cost money, and cut into revenues. Slow clouds need fixing. To do this, I think we need to go beyond APM, and start with the business problem. Too often, IT professionals start at the bottom and work up. “Server 10 is down, which means the support site isn’t working, which means the phone queue is too long, which impacts our customer satisfaction rating.” They begin with the means, and work back to the end.

Instead, I think we need to step back and look at the business model. From that, we can derive the relevant metrics, and what’s considered an acceptable threshold. Then we can measure against those thresholds, and report on violations. That’s a much more palpable approach to measurement for executives. Starting at the model and working down says we say, “7% of visits need to result in an enrollment for us to meet our monthly target.” From that, we can measure the steps of an enrollment, and their performance against the past or response targets.

When we owned the infrastructure, this was considered progressive. But the fog of cloud monitoring means it’s often the only way we can measure. It lets us size cloud consumption, which in turn lets us define budgets—since with the right architecture, you can have any performance you can pay for. And it leads to good metrics, since it’s focused on rates and exceptions rather than averages.

We’ll be talking about how to measure cloud-based applications at this spring’s Cloud Connect event in Santa Clara. In fact, we have a whole track of content dedicated to it, including sessions on WAN, application delivery networks, load-balancing, and choosing the right metrics. Clouds are the IT of abundance, and they fundamentally change how we measure applications. Let’s figure out how.

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry by Private & Hybrid Clouds Track Chair Barb Goldworm.

Hybrid clouds are getting a lot of attention these days and rightly so. Many believe that given time, everything will ultimately be a hybrid cloud of some type.  The question is not if, but rather what, where, when, who, and how.

  • What type of cloud(s) should you be implementing– private, public, community…?
  • Where should different workloads run (cloud or not and which type of cloud)?
  • When should different workloads migrate?
  • Who are the leaders, both as private cloud component players and as service providers?
  • And of course, how do you get there, securely and efficiently?

These are the questions we will be focusing on at Cloud Connect in our Private and Hybrid Cloud track, and our Private Cloud workshop. We have a great line up of topics and speakers to help you navigate the road to cloud.  With leaders from OpenStack, Eucalytpus, CloudStack/Citrix, VMware, Cisco, BlueLock  and more we will be drilling down into how to go about building a private/hybrid cloud with today’s tools and services, what’s coming down the road, and how to start now, with an eye towards the future.

In the Building VMware-based Private Clouds session , Neela Jacques (one of our top rated VMware speakers) , will share VMware’s experiences to-date in building clouds, as well as how VMware’s new vision of software defined datacenters can fit into and shape your future plans.

Based on rave reviews from past sessions, we are doing an encore of a rapid fire comparison session, Comparing Cloud Orchestration Stacks, with leading cloud orchestration stack vendors answering ten key questions on their stacks, and then inviting you to dig deeper with them.

On the public vs. private debate/discussion, we have a panel of experts including a cloud stack vendor and service providers, looking at  Hybrid Clouds – Can you Get the Best of Both Cloud Worlds (Public and Private).

And continuing the discussion around orchestration and management, Scott Hammond, VP of strategy, Cloud & Systems Management  from Cisco will leverage his background in service management and discuss  Enabling IT as a Service – Cloud Management and Orchestration.

So join our conversation on what, where, when, who and how, and take home some practical answers on the next stops on your road to cloud.

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

Here are a few reasons why to register before you get on site at Cloud Connect Chicago:

  • Prices are set to increase onsite in Chicago. By registering today, you will receive a $200 discount on conference passes or get a free expo pass by clicking on this link!
  • Registering allows you access to the Cloud Connect Mobile App. Get event information at your fingertips including exhibitors, sessions, events, news, exhibition floor plan, new products and show specials. Plus, receive suggestions based on your interests, create short lists, plan your agenda, take notes, get directions, and more!
  • Once you arrive at Cloud Connect, you can quickly print your badge off of one of the computers provided and get
    right on the show floor! Otherwise you will need to spend time registering yourself and your team onsite.
  • Tell all of your friends and colleagues that you are attending Cloud Connect conference and workshop sessions. It will ensure your organization is equipped to leverage new cloud and big data technology solutions in order to increase efficiency and improve your business agility. They will be super jealous!

Looking forward to seeing you in Chicago!

Feel free to follow me on Twitter for inside Cloud Connect updates.

Cheers,

Jason

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry from Big Data Track Chair Jeremy Edberg.

We’re introducinga new program at the upcoming Cloud Connect Chicago on ”BIG DATA: FUNDAMENTALS TO BEST PRACTICES“. BUT what is Big Data? I get asked that question often. Just the other day, I did a search on Google News for [Big Data]. What I found was a long list of blogs and news stories, many of which were trying to define Big Data.

I’ll make the answer easy — we don’t have a definition because it means too many things to too many people. To some it means using the latest NoSql technology; to others Big Data is just a repackaging of data mining and business intelligence. Continue Reading »

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry from Scott Bils, the Organizational Readiness & Business Cases Track Chair.

GE’s Jack Welch once stated, “Change before you have to.” While it’s certainly sage advice, with virtually everything in the cloud computing world evolving so rapidly – the offerings, the providers, the implementation strategies, and the buyers, who these days are most typically business users rather than IT – it’s dauntingly difficult to decide what, how, when and with whom to change.

Yet, following in the footsteps of the highly successful, inaugural Organizational Readiness track at the Cloud Connect conference in February 2012, the sessions at the September 11-12 event in Chicago are all designed to cut through the clutter, and provide deep insights on the organizational issues that are threatening to thwart cloud-oriented next generation IT success.

In “New World Order: Your Dev Team Just Became the CIO” session, industry analyst Vanessa Alvarez and Cisco’s Laura Cooney will discuss the emergence of developers as decision makers, what organizations are doing to adjust to this revolution, the technologies to look at, and pitfalls to avoid.

With budgets increasingly migrating to “shadow” IT driven by business users, it is more critical than ever for CIOs to understand how to serve and enable this new buyer group in a next generation IT environment. During the “Tough Questions You Need to Ask” session, business users who have driven major cloud initiatives will provide answers to questions CIOs may be afraid to ask.

The panel session “Hard Choices in Enterprise Cloud Adoption” will feature three 15-minute drill-down presentations that provide insight into the major choices and decisions organizations face around:

  • Open versus Closed Cloud Infrastructures, and the pros and cons of each
  • Forklift versus Greenfield, and how to determine if you should first focus on moving existing applications to a virtualized environment, or deploy a new infrastructure for greenfield applications
  • Now versus Later, to help CIOs evaluate whether they should accelerate or put a hold on their
    enterprises’ move to the cloud

“Current Thinking in Addressing Persistent Cloud Challenges” will examine Security and Compliance, Performance, Vendor Management and Lock-In issues, and provide practical, real-world examples of how panelists’ and other organizations are creatively addressing them.

If you haven’t yet registered for Cloud Connect, I hope you’ll visit the conference registration page and sign up today. Use code TFPQCH02 to receive 25% off conference passes or claim a free expo pass. You’ll unquestionably gain strategic, tactical and actionable insights on how to shine much needed light into all things cloud. As Chair of the Organizational Readiness track, I look forward to seeing you in Chicago in September!

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

Here are five ways that you can accelerate your cloud computing strategy at Cloud Connect Chicago:

  1. Attend 30+ sessions across 8 conference tracks including big data, cloud infrastructure, application design and architecture.
  2. Hear from keynotes and top industry leaders as they discuss hot topics including private and hybrid clouds, mobile clouds, and cloud performance.
  3. See all the latest cloud solutions from 50+leading companies.
  4. Enjoy vendor-hosted beverages while you check out the latest products and network during the Cocktail Reception on the Expo floor.
  5. Hear about new cloud solutions hosted in the new Cloud Solutions Theater.

Cloud Connect Chicago will provide four days of inspiring cloud dialogue and get you up to speed on how to leverage new cloud technology solutions to increase efficiency and improve your business agility. Register by August 10 with priority code RFPQCH04 to save $400 on Platinum or Conference passes. Don’t forget to tell your friends as well!

Feel free to follow me on Twitter for inside Cloud Connect updates.

Cheers,

Jason

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry from WAN and Cloud Networking Track Chair Eric Hanselman.

When interconnection works well, it’s invisible to the user or the application that’s taking advantage of it. For a long time, we’ve lived in environments where the bulk of the interconnection that we need runs really well. As virtualization and cloud deployments have scaled up, we’ve started to hit the limits of the traditional ways of interconnecting. Those limits are in capacity, but also, increasingly, limits in agility are becoming a greater concern. The big benefits of cloud are hard to achieve, if the networks on which they run can’t keep up. The networking track at Cloud Connect Chicago 2012 will look at these issues and explore how to deal with them and manage needs for sophisticated interconnection. Continue Reading »

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry from ROI, TCO, and Cloud Economics Track Chair Joe Weinman.Joe Weinman

IT, in terms of both applications and the infrastructure to run them, is becoming increasingly pervasive in our society, with the cloud playing a larger and larger role.  CIOs and business executives understandably need to consider how best to leverage this technology.  Is IT just plumbing, as relevant to the strategic needs of the business as, say, parking lot design or lighting fixture selection?  Or is it a strategic weapon that when wielded properly can win battles, or even wars, in today’s hyper-competitive global marketplace? Continue Reading »

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