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Archive for the tag 'design'

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry from Scott Bils, the Organizational Readiness & Business Cases Track Chair.

GE’s Jack Welch once stated, “Change before you have to.” While it’s certainly sage advice, with virtually everything in the cloud computing world evolving so rapidly – the offerings, the providers, the implementation strategies, and the buyers, who these days are most typically business users rather than IT – it’s dauntingly difficult to decide what, how, when and with whom to change.

Yet, following in the footsteps of the highly successful, inaugural Organizational Readiness track at the Cloud Connect conference in February 2012, the sessions at the September 11-12 event in Chicago are all designed to cut through the clutter, and provide deep insights on the organizational issues that are threatening to thwart cloud-oriented next generation IT success.

In “New World Order: Your Dev Team Just Became the CIO” session, industry analyst Vanessa Alvarez and Cisco’s Laura Cooney will discuss the emergence of developers as decision makers, what organizations are doing to adjust to this revolution, the technologies to look at, and pitfalls to avoid.

With budgets increasingly migrating to “shadow” IT driven by business users, it is more critical than ever for CIOs to understand how to serve and enable this new buyer group in a next generation IT environment. During the “Tough Questions You Need to Ask” session, business users who have driven major cloud initiatives will provide answers to questions CIOs may be afraid to ask.

The panel session “Hard Choices in Enterprise Cloud Adoption” will feature three 15-minute drill-down presentations that provide insight into the major choices and decisions organizations face around:

  • Open versus Closed Cloud Infrastructures, and the pros and cons of each
  • Forklift versus Greenfield, and how to determine if you should first focus on moving existing applications to a virtualized environment, or deploy a new infrastructure for greenfield applications
  • Now versus Later, to help CIOs evaluate whether they should accelerate or put a hold on their
    enterprises’ move to the cloud

“Current Thinking in Addressing Persistent Cloud Challenges” will examine Security and Compliance, Performance, Vendor Management and Lock-In issues, and provide practical, real-world examples of how panelists’ and other organizations are creatively addressing them.

If you haven’t yet registered for Cloud Connect, I hope you’ll visit the conference registration page and sign up today. Use code TFPQCH02 to receive 25% off conference passes or claim a free expo pass. You’ll unquestionably gain strategic, tactical and actionable insights on how to shine much needed light into all things cloud. As Chair of the Organizational Readiness track, I look forward to seeing you in Chicago in September!

 
Published by

David Linthicum

Many consider cloud computing as a shortcut, an IT path that uses technology to wire around the need to plan.  Architecture and design are big parts of traditional plans.  Without a sound foundation of good architecture and design best practices, your cloud computing project will fail.  This is true for traditional projects as well as for your cloud computing strategy.  Many are finding this out the hard way as cloud computing projects begin to ramp up. 

Architecture and design come in two core patterns: Those that integrate the use of cloud computing services, either PaaS, IaaS, or SaaS, with existing enterprise IT systems which extend those systems to the platforms of the clouds.  Or, there is the second pattern, those that actually build private, community, or public cloud services for use within a single enterprise, a community of users, or perhaps become public cloud computing providers themselves.

There are a range of cloud computing startups with unique solutions that require specialized approaches to cloud computing concepts including multitenancy, virtualized and managed resources, as well as advanced security solutions.  New ground is covered each day, and the approaches to architecture and design in the world of cloud computing continuously evolve.

Now is the time to get smart around the right and the wrong ways to design and build clouds.  Understand best practices, and, yes, learn and borrow from architecture and design practices from days gone by.  SOA and existing application and enterprise architecture approaches and techniques have proven themselves in the enterprise, and are now proving their value as we extend those architectures to public, private, and hybrid cloud computing.  In short, we’re converging what’s best with the existing architecture approaches and techniques, with what’s emerging in the world of cloud computing. 

So, what are the proper ways to design, build, and leverage cloud computing systems?  What are the steps to success?  What are the emerging best practices?  At Cloud Connect, we’ve put together a track that covers a range of topics relating to the right and wrong ways to leverage, design, and build cloud-based systems and infrastructure.  This includes advice from those currently in the trenches who make cloud computing work for the Global 2000 and government, to those who will soon fight to make cloud computing work for their clients, employers, and/or investors. 

Sessions that will guide you through this process include my session on “How to Get Cloud Architecture and Design Right the First Time,” where I walk you through the basics of design and architecture as applied to cloud computing.  Moreover, there is Bernard Golden’s session on “Cloud Applications: New Techniques for Developers,” including how to deal with elasticity and scalability. 

 If cloud computing is in your future, you need to start here.  With a bit of planning, and some good architecture and design disciplines, you can do amazing things.

 

 
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