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Archive for the tag 'OpenStack'

 
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An entry by Dave Roberts, Virtualization and Private Clouds Track Chair at Cloud Connect.

It’s a “coming of age” story, really. The cloud computing movement is reaching a new stage in its evolution. Many early clouds were built on top of existing server virtualization systems, with the primary objective of demonstrating the underlying technologies. Having proven that cloud computing works, enterprises are now looking to graduate to clouds that will support the long-term, production needs of the business; they are looking to build professional-grade clouds that will carry them the full distance. But that then begs the question, what makes a cloud “professional-grade?”

I see three primary differentiators that characterize professional-grade clouds:

  1. The ability to deliver a range of services to the broad group of end-users served by IT. Overwhelmingly, the first use-case targeted by most cloud pilots is software development and testing. Software development is a natural fit for cloud computing since developers and testers usually have a spikey demand for infrastructure, which makes the economic model a no-brainer. Further, these early users are quite technical, and so any rough spots in the cloud user-interface can be overlooked to keep the pilot project on track. But the simple user-interfaces delivered during the pilot phase typically don’t work well as the cloud moves to production and the user base expands to include non-technical business users. Instead, you’ll want a self-service interface that even a marketing intern could love, an interface that can deliver more than raw developer building blocks like Windows or Linux virtual machines. You’ll need a service catalog with user authentication, role-based access control, and the ability to provision complete, fully-configured end-user applications like Sharepoint, wikis, and collaboration tools.
  2. The ability to support the diverse set of cloud platforms required by the enterprise, both current and future. Many early clouds were built as mere extensions of the existing server virtualization platform already deployed at the time. Take virtualization, add a self-service interface, and you’re done! That’s a reasonable decision for a pilot program or technology demonstration, but it won’t go the distance. A professional-grade cloud will use a real cloud management platform to insulate cloud users from all the underlying implementation choices, making it easy to build hybrid clouds based on a variety of underlying implementation technologies: VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer, OpenStack, a variety of public cloud providers, and even bare metal. Further, we all know that needs and technologies will evolve over time; a professional-grade cloud anticipates that future change and takes it in stride.
  3. Integration with IT processes and systems needed by the business. Most early clouds are built with clean-sheet design principles, implemented as independent islands outside normal IT processes and not integrated with existing systems. This allows the pilot project to get up and running quickly and to remain uncluttered by traditional IT thinking. Over time, however, the enterprise needs to be able to manage the performance, capacity, security, and change capabilities of the cloud, just as it does today with physical and virtualized infrastructure. Does this mean weighing down your nice, sleek, agile new cloud with two-tons of ITIL? No, not necessarily. Well-built, enterprise-class clouds cooperate with other IT systems, delivering the appropriate I-dotting and T-crossing with integration and automation so that enterprise compliance requirements and business policies remain enforced.

Now that cloud computing is growing up and going mainstream, it’s time that we got past the pilots and demos and started building professional-grade clouds that can meet real needs across the business, built for the long haul. We can leverage all the work we have done with those early projects and move them forward, building the advanced set of capabilities that will serve as the foundation moving forward.

Register for Cloud Connect Chicago with priority code SMBlog and save up to $500* on your All Access or Conference Pass.

*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $1,699.00 Conference: $1,299.00, Keynote & Expo Only: Free

 
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Kristi Ibello

There is no question OpenStack is hot. Growth of other open source cloud software is flattening but OpenStack enjoys rising interest, developer attention and deployments. Support from a diverse ecosystem of major corporations, governments and startups has allowed OpenStack to grow faster than any project in the history of open source software. As OpenStack enjoys rising market share it is important for developers and IT departments to gain and informed point of view on the status of OpenStack, as well as a more nuanced understanding of how the software might play a role in helping organizations deploy cloud infrastructure to support business units.

That is why Cloud Connect Chicago has expanded its 2013 Conference lineup to include an all new OpenStack Boot Camp and OpenStack Track. These sessions will help you separate marketing hype from what’s real in OpenStack and understand how companies are using OpenStack in production today. Sessions include:

 

OpenStack Boot Camp

Separate marketing hype from what’s real and gain an informed point of view on the status of OpenStack, as well as a more nuanced understanding of how the software will play a role in helping your organization deploy cloud infrastructure.

Hype vs. Reality: What Works and What Needs Work in OpenStack

Dig deep into each OpenStack service and gain a candid assessment including which components are ready for prime time, and which ones are incomplete or broken.

 

 

APIs, Architecture, and the Realities of Cloud Bursting

APIs are the currency that unlocks value in cloud infrastructure, and the capabilities of an API are only as good as the cloud infrastructure’s ability to deliver on what that API has promised. With the right APIs and the right architecture, hybrid cloud with OpenStack can be both practical and economical.

Which Cloud Should You Build? Elastic or Enterprise?

What do the applications look like that you want to run on OpenStack? Do they look like the legacy enterprise applications that we’ve been running in enterprise data centers for the past 30 years? Attend this session to find out.

Don’t forget to register for Cloud Connect Chicago by September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your FREE Expo Pass. To learn more about the OpenStack sessions at Cloud Connect click here.

 
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Cloud Connect is excited to announce the 2013 Chicago Conference Lineup. With the competition heating up between CloudStack, OpenStack and Eucalyptus, the new Cloud Connect Conference program pits these players against each other and allows you to evaluate the competing choices, to put all the issues on the table, fuel intelligent dialogue and stimulate the necessary debates. New tracks include:

Visit the Session Scheduler to see all Conference Tracks and start planning your itinerary today. And, don’t forget to lock in Early Bird pricing, register before September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your free Expo Pass. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

 
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I’m not sure what the answer to that question is, but that’s why I’ll be at Cloud Connect to find out.  I plan to attend the panel discussion from the keynote stage covering the hot topic of open source, which will be moderated by the highly acclaimed venture capitalist, Ann Winblad, Co-founder and Managing Director of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners.  Ann most recently was quoted in Wall Street Journal’s All Things D around IBM’s announcement that all of its cloud services and software will be based on an open cloud architecture. Good news for IBM customers, bad news for VMware’s vCloud or Citrix’s CloudStack, and representative that OpenStack is a key component to the software-defined data center.  As such, it only makes sense to bring an expert to the stage, from a firm that has had a long-term investment interest in open source software and open standards, to further discuss.  Ann will be joined by panelists from Citrix, CloudOps and Red Hat on Thursday, April 4 during the event.  Join me and we can find out together if clouds are indeed, the gateway drug.

But we can’t stop there because besides the excitement of welcoming Ann Winblad to the main stage, Cloud Connect also just announced their expanded keynote line-up, which includes the likes of Margaret Dawson of HP Cloud Services, Jim Davies of Mitel, Kit Colbert of VMWare and more. An impressive line-up of industry visionaries helping shape the cloud computing industry today.  And with a finger on the pulse of all key cloud computing trends – like big data, open source and PaaS – Cloud Connect has a new addition to the program: DEPLOYCON 2013, produced by Rishidot Research LLC, will be a one-day workshop on Tuesday covering all things PaaS.  DEPLOYCON is intended to bring together CIOs, enterprise managers, IT and developers to discuss how organizations can better leverage Platform Services to enable IT transformation to agile IT.

It’s a chocked-full line-up and will most likely make for a jam-packed schedule.  Cloud Connect is just over two weeks out, happening the first week of April, and with so much happening in the industry, you don’t want to miss it.  Time to start building your schedule now!

Joylyn Tanner
Senior Communications Manager
UBM Tech

 

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A post from Cloud Connect’s Private Cloud Track Chair, Dave Roberts.

When cloud computing was young, most people theorized that the industry and foundational technology would develop very similarly to the early days of electric utilities. All this capital investment in enterprise IT, people said, would be replaced by the purchase of computing as a service from open market producers. Instead of buying and depreciating large hardware and software systems, we’d leave those purchases to the service providers and buy our computing “by the drink,” paying only for what we used. When we were done, we’d flick the computing equivalent of a light switch and the meter would stop. If you’re old enough to remember, before we called it “cloud computing,” we originally called it “utility computing.”

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