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Archive for the tag 'OpenStack'

 
Published by

Kristi Ibello

There is no question OpenStack is hot. Growth of other open source cloud software is flattening but OpenStack enjoys rising interest, developer attention and deployments. Support from a diverse ecosystem of major corporations, governments and startups has allowed OpenStack to grow faster than any project in the history of open source software. As OpenStack enjoys rising market share it is important for developers and IT departments to gain and informed point of view on the status of OpenStack, as well as a more nuanced understanding of how the software might play a role in helping organizations deploy cloud infrastructure to support business units.

That is why Cloud Connect Chicago has expanded its 2013 Conference lineup to include an all new OpenStack Boot Camp and OpenStack Track. These sessions will help you separate marketing hype from what’s real in OpenStack and understand how companies are using OpenStack in production today. Sessions include:

 

OpenStack Boot Camp

Separate marketing hype from what’s real and gain an informed point of view on the status of OpenStack, as well as a more nuanced understanding of how the software will play a role in helping your organization deploy cloud infrastructure.

Hype vs. Reality: What Works and What Needs Work in OpenStack

Dig deep into each OpenStack service and gain a candid assessment including which components are ready for prime time, and which ones are incomplete or broken.

 

 

APIs, Architecture, and the Realities of Cloud Bursting

APIs are the currency that unlocks value in cloud infrastructure, and the capabilities of an API are only as good as the cloud infrastructure’s ability to deliver on what that API has promised. With the right APIs and the right architecture, hybrid cloud with OpenStack can be both practical and economical.

Which Cloud Should You Build? Elastic or Enterprise?

What do the applications look like that you want to run on OpenStack? Do they look like the legacy enterprise applications that we’ve been running in enterprise data centers for the past 30 years? Attend this session to find out.

Don’t forget to register for Cloud Connect Chicago by September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your FREE Expo Pass. To learn more about the OpenStack sessions at Cloud Connect click here.

 
Published by

Cloud Connect is excited to announce the 2013 Chicago Conference Lineup. With the competition heating up between CloudStack, OpenStack and Eucalyptus, the new Cloud Connect Conference program pits these players against each other and allows you to evaluate the competing choices, to put all the issues on the table, fuel intelligent dialogue and stimulate the necessary debates. New tracks include:

Visit the Session Scheduler to see all Conference Tracks and start planning your itinerary today. And, don’t forget to lock in Early Bird pricing, register before September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your free Expo Pass. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

 
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I’m not sure what the answer to that question is, but that’s why I’ll be at Cloud Connect to find out.  I plan to attend the panel discussion from the keynote stage covering the hot topic of open source, which will be moderated by the highly acclaimed venture capitalist, Ann Winblad, Co-founder and Managing Director of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners.  Ann most recently was quoted in Wall Street Journal’s All Things D around IBM’s announcement that all of its cloud services and software will be based on an open cloud architecture. Good news for IBM customers, bad news for VMware’s vCloud or Citrix’s CloudStack, and representative that OpenStack is a key component to the software-defined data center.  As such, it only makes sense to bring an expert to the stage, from a firm that has had a long-term investment interest in open source software and open standards, to further discuss.  Ann will be joined by panelists from Citrix, CloudOps and Red Hat on Thursday, April 4 during the event.  Join me and we can find out together if clouds are indeed, the gateway drug.

But we can’t stop there because besides the excitement of welcoming Ann Winblad to the main stage, Cloud Connect also just announced their expanded keynote line-up, which includes the likes of Margaret Dawson of HP Cloud Services, Jim Davies of Mitel, Kit Colbert of VMWare and more. An impressive line-up of industry visionaries helping shape the cloud computing industry today.  And with a finger on the pulse of all key cloud computing trends – like big data, open source and PaaS – Cloud Connect has a new addition to the program: DEPLOYCON 2013, produced by Rishidot Research LLC, will be a one-day workshop on Tuesday covering all things PaaS.  DEPLOYCON is intended to bring together CIOs, enterprise managers, IT and developers to discuss how organizations can better leverage Platform Services to enable IT transformation to agile IT.

It’s a chocked-full line-up and will most likely make for a jam-packed schedule.  Cloud Connect is just over two weeks out, happening the first week of April, and with so much happening in the industry, you don’t want to miss it.  Time to start building your schedule now!

Joylyn Tanner
Senior Communications Manager
UBM Tech

 

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A post from Cloud Connect’s Private Cloud Track Chair, Dave Roberts.

When cloud computing was young, most people theorized that the industry and foundational technology would develop very similarly to the early days of electric utilities. All this capital investment in enterprise IT, people said, would be replaced by the purchase of computing as a service from open market producers. Instead of buying and depreciating large hardware and software systems, we’d leave those purchases to the service providers and buy our computing “by the drink,” paying only for what we used. When we were done, we’d flick the computing equivalent of a light switch and the meter would stop. If you’re old enough to remember, before we called it “cloud computing,” we originally called it “utility computing.”

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