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Archive for the tag 'TCO'

 
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This isn’t a simple question to answer.

First of all, cloud computing is hidden behind a fog of abstraction. Whereas IT could once instrument every element of an application, today applications are like Descartes’ brain in a jar—never quite sure if they’re real, or virtual.

Second, on the surface many service providers’ goals aren’t aligned with those of their customers’. Service providers want to maximize revenues, and want the freedom to do with the underlying infrastructure what they will. That’s how they stay in business and make the most of what they have. Without that freedom, they lose economies of scale and skill. By contrast, customers want special treatment, and instrumentation all the way down the stack.

Third, people don’t really understand metrics well. Despite decades of criticism, we still use averages, even though they hide important fluctuations in service quality that can warn of bigger problems before they become disasters.

There’s a bigger problem here, however. For half a century, IT has been about protecting precious resources. The reason you put up with carrying a stack of punched cards to the basement of the computing building at 3AM was because the mainframe was scarce, and the humans abundant. No more: each of us has three screens, one of which is seldom more than a meter from our bodies at any time.

That means we’re less concerned about the consumption of resources and more concerned about the completion of tasks. We shouldn’t really care if the CPU is idle or maxed out, provided that the user accomplish what they set out to do. Proponents of Service Level Agreements have long known this, but cloud monitoring, hiding behind the fog of virtualization, drives it home hard.

Application Performance Management and Real User Monitoring have long been thought of as “advanced” forms of measurement*. These go beyond up/down metrics or numbers related to utilization, and instead look at the success of the application from the user’s point of view. They’ve often languished somewhere between web analytics (which show you what users did) and synthetic monitoring (which shows you whether the site is working.)

Today, however, the real question is: could they do it, well? There’s great evidence that slow applications undermine productivity, cost money, and cut into revenues. Slow clouds need fixing. To do this, I think we need to go beyond APM, and start with the business problem. Too often, IT professionals start at the bottom and work up. “Server 10 is down, which means the support site isn’t working, which means the phone queue is too long, which impacts our customer satisfaction rating.” They begin with the means, and work back to the end.

Instead, I think we need to step back and look at the business model. From that, we can derive the relevant metrics, and what’s considered an acceptable threshold. Then we can measure against those thresholds, and report on violations. That’s a much more palpable approach to measurement for executives. Starting at the model and working down says we say, “7% of visits need to result in an enrollment for us to meet our monthly target.” From that, we can measure the steps of an enrollment, and their performance against the past or response targets.

When we owned the infrastructure, this was considered progressive. But the fog of cloud monitoring means it’s often the only way we can measure. It lets us size cloud consumption, which in turn lets us define budgets—since with the right architecture, you can have any performance you can pay for. And it leads to good metrics, since it’s focused on rates and exceptions rather than averages.

We’ll be talking about how to measure cloud-based applications at this spring’s Cloud Connect event in Santa Clara. In fact, we have a whole track of content dedicated to it, including sessions on WAN, application delivery networks, load-balancing, and choosing the right metrics. Clouds are the IT of abundance, and they fundamentally change how we measure applications. Let’s figure out how.

 
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Adrian Cockcroft is the director of architecture for the Cloud Systems team at Netflix. He is focused on availability, Adrian Cockcroftresilience,performance, and measurement of the Netflix cloud platform, and has presented at many conferences, including the Cassandra Summit, QCon/GOTO, Cloud Connect, Velocity, Gluecon and Structure.Adrian is also well known as the author of several books while a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems: Sun Performance and Tuning; Resource Management; and Capacity Planning for Web Services. From 2004-2007 he was a founding member of eBay Research Labs. He graduated with a BSc in Applied Physics from The City University, London.

Here is an inside peek at his session at Cloud Connect – Netflix and Amazon Web Services Case Study: Strategy and Economics of the Cloud

  • Perhaps the best well known case study for cloud use is Netflix’ use of Amazon for transcoding and streaming. Jinesh Varia, Amazon’s leading expert in Cloud Economics will review cloud cost justification approaches and financial models. Adrian Cockcroft will delve into Netflix’ rationale for using AWS.

Register with priority code SMCCBlog by March 2 and save up to $500* on your Cloud Connect All Access or Conference Pass.

*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $1,899.00 Conference: $1,499.00, Workshop: 699.00, Expo Plus: $100.00, Expo Only: Free

 
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Kristi Ibello

Cloud Connect was recently named one of the Top Cloud Computing Events of 2013 by Enterprise CIO Forum. We are proud to have topped the list and be named the Conference and Expo where IT professionals come for the latest cloud computing training and information. Here are 10 reasons why you should register and join us April 2-5 in Silicon Valley:

10) SEE NEW PRODUCTS. Find new solutions to your cloud, security, infrastructure and projects.

9) ENGAGE WITH MULTIPLE COMPANIES AT ONE TIME. Meet with 100+ industry leaders including VMware, Citrix, Cisco, Softlayer, Rackspace, IBM, Oracle and more!

8 ) SEE SPECIFIC COMPANIES OR PRODUCTS. Ready to renegotiate service agreements and/or upgrade to the next version? Make the most of your time by scheduling meetings at Cloud Connect.

7) CREATE AND STRENGTHEN PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS. Grab breakfast, lunch or a beer and make connections that will help you throughout the year.

6) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Learn from peers, analysts and other end users in the Cloud Connect Conference sessions including cloud & big data, virtualization, security, and how to build private and public clouds.

5) KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON INDUSTRY TRENDS AND ISSUES. Hear industry experts and end users discuss use cases and best practices surrounding their cloud migration. Check out the 2013 Keynote Speakers.

4) SEE EXISTING SUPPLIERS. Gain insight into competition and find what others are delivering or how they are providing service.

3) NETWORK WITH COLLEAGUES. With so many like-minded professionals under one roof, learn how others are tackling similar problems in your industry.

2) SEE PRODUCTS “IN-PERSON” FIRST REVIEWED ONLINE. Touch, test and question all the new technologies you’ve read about.

1) DEEP DIVE WORKSHOPS. Gain new skills and help advance your career by attending one of Cloud Connects Workshops including Big Data, Cloud Crash Course, Advanced Cloud Courses, and Navigating PaaS.

BONUS REASON) An incredible value! Register now and pay just $1,899 for all 4 days of actionable content, invaluable connections and essential training.

Register today and experience why Cloud Connect topped the list!
PS: Want to send the team? You can save 30% for your group, just email one of our registration experts to learn more.

 
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Kristi Ibello

Cloud Connect teamed up with Everest Group to conduct a first of its kind research project around the enterprise adoption of cloud computing.  The survey looked at how businesses currently use cloud computing and examined their future adoption plans.  

The results suggest a changing buyer mindset that will challenge our current assumptions and serve as a reality check for cloud suppliers. The biggest disconnect in the results found that buyers and providers see cloud adoption drivers differently.  

  • Business users are adopting for agility, flexibility and time-to market advantages
  • Whereas service providers believe it’s due to cost. 

This suggests that providers are stuck in legacy mindset selling ‘next generation infrastructure’ instead of a new paradigm. The following Infographic highlights some of the key takeaways from the research and the top 3 adoption drivers of cloud buyers: Continue Reading »

 
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Kristi Ibello

This is my magnificent post about who I am and my role in the Cloud Connect family. My name is Kristi Ibello @klibello and I’m the Senior Marketing Manager for Cloud Connect… the person who sends you emails every week and helps to ensure you have the best experience online and on-site at our events! My reasons for joining the Cloud Connect team are pretty simple – I enjoy helping others leverage new tools and resources that will ultimately help them drive value and growth for themselves and their business. I get to work with cool people and being part of a live event team allows me to meet new and
interesting colleagues like you.

Here inside the UBM Tech office, we are cooking up some new programs and content to ensure that you get the latest cloud computing information and I cannot wait to announce our full conference program in a few weeks… I think it will be our most exciting Conference and Expo yet. A few fun facts about myself:

  • I enjoy soccer, soccer and more soccer.
  • My worst household chore is keeping the dishes clean.
  • My favorite candy is Andy mints, send me some and I will be your friend for life.

I am the master of the Cloud Connect mobile app and welcome any challenges who dare take my place as top dog. I look forward to seeing everyone at Cloud Connect Silicon Valley 2013!

Kristi

 
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Jason Quesada

Cloud computing has changed the IT landscape over the past decade. This new technology came onto the technology scene at such a fast and furious pace that is seemed like it appeared out of….well from the clouds. However, behind the clouds, there are innovative people that made cloud computing happen.  Charles Babcock, Editor At Large, for InformationWeek, looked at the short history of cloud computing and identified 10 cloud computing pioneers that have paved the way for cloud knowledge and adoption. Continue Reading »

 
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Jason Quesada

A blog entry from ROI, TCO, and Cloud Economics Track Chair Joe Weinman.Joe Weinman

IT, in terms of both applications and the infrastructure to run them, is becoming increasingly pervasive in our society, with the cloud playing a larger and larger role.  CIOs and business executives understandably need to consider how best to leverage this technology.  Is IT just plumbing, as relevant to the strategic needs of the business as, say, parking lot design or lighting fixture selection?  Or is it a strategic weapon that when wielded properly can win battles, or even wars, in today’s hyper-competitive global marketplace? Continue Reading »

 
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Jason Quesada

A post from Lauren Nelson, ROI, TCO, and Cloud Economics Track Chair at Cloud Connect.

Turnin’ it off is when you save — that’s Cloud Economics 101. The truth behind the promised savings comes from its pay-by-usage-without-contract billing model and is exactly what makes cloud a powerful technology. But often this core concept is lost in the evaluation of application fit. If you’re always powering up VMs but rarely powering down, cloud isn’t going to save you money. And this isn’t the only confusion around the cloud economics.

The ROI, TCO, and Cloud Economics track at Cloud Connect seeks to clear the fog by answering your biggest questions around these topics today. Not only will this track touch on Cloud Economics 101, but it will also provide a realistic ROI/TCO model for specific applications, share best practices and mistakes from cloud adopters, unveil lesser known cloud costs, and discuss the organizational challenges involved with creating a chargeback system for internal private cloud environments.

Continue Reading »

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