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Archive for the tag 'virtualization'

 
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emilyjohnson

By Emily Johnson

Cloud Connect Chicago 2013 is taking a new approach to the program this year. The focus is on the top cloud computing infrastructure management platforms including: OpenStack, CloudStack, Eucalyptus and VMware and the full-fledged stack wars that are currently playing out in the media.

We had an opportunity to sit down with Randy Bias, Cloudscaling’s CEO & CTO and Director of the OpenStack Foundation who organized the Cloud Connect OpenStack track and Boot Camp and he shared his thoughts on how his program is coming together and what he thinks attendees will gain from it. Continue Reading »

 
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For many organizations, cloud computing has become an integral part of IT, but they continue to face critical technology decisions as competing platforms push for market leadership.  OpenStack, CloudStack and Eucalyptus are the clear frontrunners in the open source infrastructure as a service (IaaS) space. But questions are still lingering: Is one really better than the other? What are the technical differences? Which best supports the integration of legacy systems with cloud-based apps? Which is better for startups versus SMBs and Enterprises?

This year’s program for Cloud Connect Chicago pits these industry players against each other with five conference tracks, each to represent divergent cloud software strategies: Amazon Web Services & Eucalyptus, CloudStack, OpenStack, Platform-as-a-Service and Virtualization & Private Cloud.  As the unique architectures have both benefits and limitations, speakers affiliated with the different tracks will address key technology considerations and business impact across the leading use cases.

The Cloud Stack Wars will also play out on the Cloud Connect Keynote Stage. From accessibility to cost to security, AWS, CloudStack and OpenStack all have their benefits and limitations laid out on stage. Experts will join a Keynote Panel and debate the limitations, nuances, and advocate for their Cloud Stack War winner.

In addition to conference sessions, Cloud Connect will open with a full day of intensive cloud computing education through a series of Summits and Boot Camps. Be sure to attend Cloud Connect Chicago, October 21-23, and see how prevails in the Cloud Stack Wars. Register before September 16 with discount SMBLOG to save an additional $200 off Early Bird prices.

 
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Private Clouds continue to receive attention in enterprise organizations that are looking to amplify the benefits of virtualization and increase agility. While press reports about cloud computing are filled with lots of action and adventure, many enterprises are approaching cloud computing in a more methodical, step-by-step approach. Rather than build a complex hybrid cloud right from the start, many enterprises are looking to evolve from their current server virtualization environments to a full-fledged private cloud. When making this transition it is important for enterprises to consider:

  • What is the best approach for evolving from a server virtualization environment?
  • Who should access a private cloud, and under what controls?
  • How does a private cloud fit in with current IT management processes and systems?
  • What are the first use cases to target with your private cloud to ensure a “quick win?”
  • What landmines should you avoid?

Transitioning from virtualization environments to private clouds is something Dave Roberts, Sr. Director Solutions Marketing at BMC Software has spent over a decade tackling. Dave is chairing the Virtualization and Private Cloud Track at Cloud Connect Chicago 2013, where he will address these questions out help attendees build their private cloud roadmap. Sessions include:

Hear from companies including Boeing, Eucalyptus and BMC Software on how they moved from virtualization to private cloud environments. Register to attend Cloud Connect Chicago, use discount code SMBLOG and lock in Early Bird Pricing.

 
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An entry by Dave Roberts, Virtualization and Private Clouds Track Chair at Cloud Connect.

It’s a “coming of age” story, really. The cloud computing movement is reaching a new stage in its evolution. Many early clouds were built on top of existing server virtualization systems, with the primary objective of demonstrating the underlying technologies. Having proven that cloud computing works, enterprises are now looking to graduate to clouds that will support the long-term, production needs of the business; they are looking to build professional-grade clouds that will carry them the full distance. But that then begs the question, what makes a cloud “professional-grade?”

I see three primary differentiators that characterize professional-grade clouds:

  1. The ability to deliver a range of services to the broad group of end-users served by IT. Overwhelmingly, the first use-case targeted by most cloud pilots is software development and testing. Software development is a natural fit for cloud computing since developers and testers usually have a spikey demand for infrastructure, which makes the economic model a no-brainer. Further, these early users are quite technical, and so any rough spots in the cloud user-interface can be overlooked to keep the pilot project on track. But the simple user-interfaces delivered during the pilot phase typically don’t work well as the cloud moves to production and the user base expands to include non-technical business users. Instead, you’ll want a self-service interface that even a marketing intern could love, an interface that can deliver more than raw developer building blocks like Windows or Linux virtual machines. You’ll need a service catalog with user authentication, role-based access control, and the ability to provision complete, fully-configured end-user applications like Sharepoint, wikis, and collaboration tools.
  2. The ability to support the diverse set of cloud platforms required by the enterprise, both current and future. Many early clouds were built as mere extensions of the existing server virtualization platform already deployed at the time. Take virtualization, add a self-service interface, and you’re done! That’s a reasonable decision for a pilot program or technology demonstration, but it won’t go the distance. A professional-grade cloud will use a real cloud management platform to insulate cloud users from all the underlying implementation choices, making it easy to build hybrid clouds based on a variety of underlying implementation technologies: VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer, OpenStack, a variety of public cloud providers, and even bare metal. Further, we all know that needs and technologies will evolve over time; a professional-grade cloud anticipates that future change and takes it in stride.
  3. Integration with IT processes and systems needed by the business. Most early clouds are built with clean-sheet design principles, implemented as independent islands outside normal IT processes and not integrated with existing systems. This allows the pilot project to get up and running quickly and to remain uncluttered by traditional IT thinking. Over time, however, the enterprise needs to be able to manage the performance, capacity, security, and change capabilities of the cloud, just as it does today with physical and virtualized infrastructure. Does this mean weighing down your nice, sleek, agile new cloud with two-tons of ITIL? No, not necessarily. Well-built, enterprise-class clouds cooperate with other IT systems, delivering the appropriate I-dotting and T-crossing with integration and automation so that enterprise compliance requirements and business policies remain enforced.

Now that cloud computing is growing up and going mainstream, it’s time that we got past the pilots and demos and started building professional-grade clouds that can meet real needs across the business, built for the long haul. We can leverage all the work we have done with those early projects and move them forward, building the advanced set of capabilities that will serve as the foundation moving forward.

Register for Cloud Connect Chicago with priority code SMBlog and save up to $500* on your All Access or Conference Pass.

*Discount calculated based on the on-site price and not combinable with other offers. Offer good on new registrations only. Prices after discount applied: All Access: $1,699.00 Conference: $1,299.00, Keynote & Expo Only: Free

 
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Cloud Connect is excited to announce the 2013 Chicago Conference Lineup. With the competition heating up between CloudStack, OpenStack and Eucalyptus, the new Cloud Connect Conference program pits these players against each other and allows you to evaluate the competing choices, to put all the issues on the table, fuel intelligent dialogue and stimulate the necessary debates. New tracks include:

Visit the Session Scheduler to see all Conference Tracks and start planning your itinerary today. And, don’t forget to lock in Early Bird pricing, register before September 16 to save $500 on Conference Passes or claim your free Expo Pass. We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

 
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Jason Quesada

A blog entry by Private & Hybrid Clouds Track Chair Barb Goldworm.

Hybrid clouds are getting a lot of attention these days and rightly so. Many believe that given time, everything will ultimately be a hybrid cloud of some type.  The question is not if, but rather what, where, when, who, and how.

  • What type of cloud(s) should you be implementing– private, public, community…?
  • Where should different workloads run (cloud or not and which type of cloud)?
  • When should different workloads migrate?
  • Who are the leaders, both as private cloud component players and as service providers?
  • And of course, how do you get there, securely and efficiently?

These are the questions we will be focusing on at Cloud Connect in our Private and Hybrid Cloud track, and our Private Cloud workshop. We have a great line up of topics and speakers to help you navigate the road to cloud.  With leaders from OpenStack, Eucalytpus, CloudStack/Citrix, VMware, Cisco, BlueLock  and more we will be drilling down into how to go about building a private/hybrid cloud with today’s tools and services, what’s coming down the road, and how to start now, with an eye towards the future.

In the Building VMware-based Private Clouds session , Neela Jacques (one of our top rated VMware speakers) , will share VMware’s experiences to-date in building clouds, as well as how VMware’s new vision of software defined datacenters can fit into and shape your future plans.

Based on rave reviews from past sessions, we are doing an encore of a rapid fire comparison session, Comparing Cloud Orchestration Stacks, with leading cloud orchestration stack vendors answering ten key questions on their stacks, and then inviting you to dig deeper with them.

On the public vs. private debate/discussion, we have a panel of experts including a cloud stack vendor and service providers, looking at  Hybrid Clouds – Can you Get the Best of Both Cloud Worlds (Public and Private).

And continuing the discussion around orchestration and management, Scott Hammond, VP of strategy, Cloud & Systems Management  from Cisco will leverage his background in service management and discuss  Enabling IT as a Service – Cloud Management and Orchestration.

So join our conversation on what, where, when, who and how, and take home some practical answers on the next stops on your road to cloud.

 
Published by

Jason Quesada

A blog entry from WAN and Cloud Networking Track Chair Eric Hanselman.

When interconnection works well, it’s invisible to the user or the application that’s taking advantage of it. For a long time, we’ve lived in environments where the bulk of the interconnection that we need runs really well. As virtualization and cloud deployments have scaled up, we’ve started to hit the limits of the traditional ways of interconnecting. Those limits are in capacity, but also, increasingly, limits in agility are becoming a greater concern. The big benefits of cloud are hard to achieve, if the networks on which they run can’t keep up. The networking track at Cloud Connect Chicago 2012 will look at these issues and explore how to deal with them and manage needs for sophisticated interconnection. Continue Reading »

 

 
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